The Regulatory Review launches new platform

The Penn Program on Regulation’s flagship publication has changed its name to The Regulatory Review.

Over the past seven years, the Penn Program on Regulation (PPR) at the University of Pennsylvania Law School has provided daily coverage of regulatory news, analysis, and commentary through PPR’s flagship publication, RegBlog. On April 5, PPR announced a new name for this publication — The Regulatory Review — and launched a new website for its readers at www.theregreview.org.

“We are thrilled to begin operating under this new name,” says Kim Kirschenbaum L’17, who, as the Editor-in-Chief of RegBlog, spearheaded the effort to rename the publication and rebuild its website. “‘The Regulatory Review’ better reflects the caliber and quality of the long-form essays that we publish and the level of exacting effort that editing a daily publication entails.”

“The reality is that RegBlog was never a blog per se — but rather a source of highly readable, informative essays on a wide range of vital legal and policy issues,” notes Cary Coglianese, the Edward B. Shils Professor of Law and Political Science at Penn Law. Coglianese also serves as the Director of PPR and the faculty advisor to the student-run publication.

Building on RegBlog’s global audience and its stellar reputation for balanced, accessible coverage of regulatory issues, The Regulatory Review will continue to specialize in essays addressing all facets of administrative law, legislation, and regulatory policy.

“Although our publication’s name and website design will change, we have taken care to preserve the features that have long set this publication apart,” explains Kirschenbaum, who now serves as The Regulatory Review’s founding Editor-in-Chief. “We will continue to feature the same high-quality writing that has become emblematic of our content, and we will still provide, distinctively, a forum for the full range of perspectives.”

The Regulatory Review will continue to feature writing from practitioners, public officials, and leading regulatory scholars from multiple disciplines. The publication will also continue to cover a broad range of regulatory subjects, including substantive issues ranging from climate policy to financial regulation, as well as cross-cutting issues such as administrative law and benefit-cost analysis.

Over the past year, Kirschenbaum and the other Penn Law students she leads have had the privilege of editing and publishing work by sitting U.S. senators (including Senators Orrin Hatch, Mike Lee, Elizabeth Warren, and Sheldon Whitehouse), members of the federal judiciary, heads of regulatory agencies, leading practicing lawyers, and some of the foremost legal scholars, economists, and other academic researchers at Penn Law as well as many other universities around the world.

In addition, students involved in The Regulatory Review participate in a year-long seminar taught by Professor Coglianese, in which they learn about advanced issues in administrative law and regulation, hone their professional skills, and enjoy the opportunity to have their work considered for publication in The Regulatory Review.

The Regulatory Review staff invites all interested readers to visit its new home and to subscribe to its newsletter, content alerts, and social media accounts.

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